The Politics of Appropriations Earmarks: Who Gets What and Why

  • Sandy Garcia California State University Channel Islands
  • Keely Laurie California State University Channel Islands

Abstract

Earmarks. Few things in contemporary politics are as universally denounced and so miserably misunderstood. An appropriations bill allocates specific funds for an identifiable project or program in the state or district of a member of Congress. The U.S. Constitution invests Congress with the “power of the purse,” the power to spend money1. Scott Frisch and Sean Kelly argue that earmarks are a means for individual representatives to get government spending to reflect the interests of their constituents.

Author Biographies

Sandy Garcia, California State University Channel Islands
Political Science
Keely Laurie, California State University Channel Islands
Political Science
Published
2013-05-16